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SELECTBIO Conferences Organoids & Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2020

Organoids & Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2020 Agenda


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Monday, 9 November 2020

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Ken-ichiro Kamei, Associate Professor, Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Japan

00:00

Danilo TagleKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Danilo Tagle, Associate Director For Special Initiatives, Office of the Director, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the NIH (NCATS), United States of America

00:00

Tumor-on-a-Chip with a Perfusable Vascular Network
Yuji Nashimoto, Assistant Professor, Tohoku University, Japan

In this study, we integrated a tumor model with a perfusable vascular network in a microfluidic device and developed the evaluation methods using a microelectrode.

00:00

3D Modeling of Vascularized Barrier Tissues and Diseases For Preclinical Studies
Min Jae Song , Staff Scientist, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), United States of America

In vitro three dimensional (3D) cellular models enable the study of multicellular interactions within functional tissue microenvironments. The enhanced physiological relevance of these complex 3D cellular models has opened the possibility of developing human-pathologically relevant disease assays for preclinical drug discovery and development studies. However, the increased cellular and structural complexity of these 3D cellular assays pose a significant technical challenge for their morphological and physiological validation, and use for pharmacological testing. Using 3D bioprinting techniques, we have established a robust and versatile method to engineer human vascularized tissues in a multiwell format. The bioprinting-based approach, used to biofabricate vascularized tissues, included a biodegradable polymer scaffold that enabled the addition of epithelia, in a transwell format. Several human barrier tissue models with vascularization were produced, including skin, peritoneal, and ocular tissues. Once 3D models of “healthy” tissues were biofabricated and validated, disease tissue models were developed by introducing disease-relevant chemical inducers or diseased cells, like cancer cells, into the “healthy” tissues. Treatments of the disease models with FDA approved drugs or drugs in clinical trials were able to correct the disease phenotypes. The structural, functional, and pharmacological validation of these tissues is critical to enable the use of these 3D models to accelerate the drug development process by providing pre-clinical data that it is more predictive of clinical outcomes.

00:00

Nancy AllbrittonKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Nancy Allbritton, Frank and Julie Jungers Dean of the College of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, University of Washington in Seattle, United States of America

00:00

Noo Li JeonKeynote Presentation

Microfluidics in a Well: Developing a Vascularized Cancer Model
Noo Li Jeon, Professor, Seoul National University, Korea South

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Ryuji Yokokawa, Associate Professor, Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Japan

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Kennedy Okeyo, Senior Lecturer, Institute for Frontier Life and Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Ryo Sudo, Associate Professor, Keio University, Japan

00:00

CELLINKEmerging Bioprinting Methods to Fabricate Organ-on-a-chip Devices
Haruka Yoshie, Application Specialist, CELLINK

3D bioprinting has received much attention in recent years as more and more studies transition from 2D cell cultures to 3D cell cultures. Here, we present the bioprinting approach to fabricate microfluidic devices for organ-on-a-chip applications. There are different methods to create microchannel structures based on bioprinting technology. With the extrusion-based printing technology, channel structures are generally created with the sacrificial inks. Light-based printing technology such as digital light processing often enables printing of smaller and more complex structures. By mixing the biomaterials with cells, cell-embedding constructs with microfluidic channels can be bioprinted. Vascular models can be further implemented by post-print endothelial cell culturing on the wall of these microchannels to mimic the in vivo environment more closely. Using bioprinting technology, one can also print organoids. With continued developments, 3D bioprinting can offer great applications including vasculature studies and disease modeling.


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Add to Calendar ▼2020-11-09 00:00:002020-11-10 00:00:00Europe/LondonOrganoids and Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2020Organoids and Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2020 in Tokyo, JapanTokyo, JapanSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com