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SELECTBIO Conferences Organ-on-a-Chip World Congress & 3D-Culture 2017

Michael Shuler's Biography



Michael Shuler, Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering, Cornell University; President & CEO, Hesperos, Inc.

Michael L. Shuler is the Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering in Biomedical Engineering and in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University and CEO of Hesperos. Shuler received both of his degrees in chemical engineering (BS, University of Notre Dame, 1969 and Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1973) and has been a faculty member at Cornell University since January 1974. Shuler’s research is focused on biomolecular engineering and includes pioneering the development of “Body-on-a-Chip” or microphysiological system for testing pharmaceuticals and chemicals for toxicity, creation of production systems for useful compounds, such as paclitaxel from plant cell cultures, and constructions of computer models of cells relating physiological function to genomic structure. Shuler and F. Kangi have authored a popular textbook, “Bioprocess Engineering; Basic Concepts”. He has an honorary doctorate from the University of Notre Dame. He has received the Amgen Award in Biochemical Engineering, as well as the Professional Progress, Food, Pharmaceutical and Bioengineering Division Award, and the Warren K. Lewis Awards from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Also, he was the inaugural awardee for the J.E. Bailey Award from the Society for Biological Engineering. He received the Pritzker Award from Biomedical Engineering Society and the Marvin Johnson Award from the American Chemical Society. Shuler has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Science and is a fellow of numerous other professional societies.

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Human “Body-on-a-Chip” Systems to Test Drug Efficacy and Toxicity

Monday, 10 July 2017 at 11:00

Add to Calendar ▼SELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

Human microphysiological or “Body-on-a-Chip” systems are powerful tools to assess the potential efficacy and toxicity of drugs in pre-clinical studies.  Having a human based, multiorgan system, that emulates key aspects of human physiology can provide important insights to complement animal studies in the decision about which drugs to move into clinical trials.  Our human surrogates are constructed using a low cost, robust “pumpless” platform.  We use this platform in conjunction with “functional” measurements of electrical and mechanical activity of tissue constructs (in collaboration with J. Hickman, University of Central Florida). Using a system with four or more organs we can predict the exchange of metabolites between organ compartments in response to various drugs and dose levels.  We will provide examples of using the system to both predict the response of a target tissue as well as off-target responses in other tissues/organs.  We believe such models will allow improved predictors of human clinical response from preclinical studies.

Human “Body-on-a-Chip” Systems to Test Drug Efficacy and Toxicity

Monday, 10 July 2017 at 11:00

Add to Calendar ▼SELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

Human microphysiological or “Body-on-a-Chip” systems are powerful tools to assess the potential efficacy and toxicity of drugs in pre-clinical studies.  Having a human based, multiorgan system, that emulates key aspects of human physiology can provide important insights to complement animal studies in the decision about which drugs to move into clinical trials.  Our human surrogates are constructed using a low cost, robust “pumpless” platform.  We use this platform in conjunction with “functional” measurements of electrical and mechanical activity of tissue constructs (in collaboration with J. Hickman, University of Central Florida). Using a system with four or more organs we can predict the exchange of metabolites between organ compartments in response to various drugs and dose levels.  We will provide examples of using the system to both predict the response of a target tissue as well as off-target responses in other tissues/organs.  We believe such models will allow improved predictors of human clinical response from preclinical studies.


Add to Calendar ▼2017-07-10 00:00:002017-07-11 00:00:00Europe/LondonOrgan-on-a-Chip World Congress and 3D-Culture 2017Organ-on-a-Chip World Congress and 3D-Culture 2017 in Boston, USABoston, USASELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com