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SELECTBIO Conferences Extracellular Vesicle-based Dx & Rx Summit

Davide Trotti's Biography



Davide Trotti, Professor, Scientific Director, Weinberg ALS Center, Vickie and Jack Farber Institute for Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University

Neurobiologist Davide Trotti has a long standing interest in understanding the mechanisms of neuronal cell death in neurodegenerative disease. Research in Dr. Trotti's laboratory is aimed at studying the molecular mechanisms leading to motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Research objective of Dr. Trotti's laboratory is to understand the pathophysiology of ALS to provide a better and more focused molecular approach to a cure. ALS, a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's disease, is the most common adult motor neuron disease and its primary hallmark is the death of motor neurons of the spinal cord, which leads to spasticity, hyper-reflexia, general weakness and muscle atrophy. Failure of respiratory muscles is generally the fatal event, occurring within 1-5 years of symptoms onset. Dr. Trotti's laboratory has accumulated expertise in the study of pathogenic mechanisms underlying ALS. His laboratory employs a variety of molecular, electrophysiology, imaging and cell biology techniques along with molecular and genetic tools, including animal models that recapitulate the human pathology. Currently holding the rank of full professor of neuroscience at Thomas Jefferson University, Dr. Trotti is also Director of Research at the Jefferson Weinberg ALS Center.

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Cell-to-Cell Propagation of Pathogenic Aberrant Dipeptide Repeat Proteins in C9orf72-Linked Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Thursday, 28 March 2019 at 16:30

Add to Calendar ▼2019-03-28 16:30:002019-03-28 17:30:00Europe/LondonCell-to-Cell Propagation of Pathogenic Aberrant Dipeptide Repeat Proteins in C9orf72-Linked Amyotrophic Lateral SclerosisExtracellular Vesicle-based Dx and Rx Summit in Coronado Island, CaliforniaCoronado Island, CaliforniaSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

Nucleotide repeat expansions (NREs) are prevalent mutations in a multitude of neurodegenerative diseases. Abnormal translation of these repeat regions produces proteins that contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. However, the mechanisms and drivers of the aberrant translation are not well understood. Here we analyzed whether different cellular stressors promote these aberrant translations of peptides associated with the G4C2 hexanucleotide expansions in C9orf72, the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We found that activating glutamate receptors or increasing neuronal activity trigger these aberrant translation of  neurotoxic peptides. In addition, we postulate that cell-to-cell transmission of these disease-linked aberrant peptides could be a modality by which toxic insults spread in disease-afflicted CNS areas in ALS and FTD. We are presenting evidence here using in vitro and in vivo approaches that indeed transmission of these aberrantly translated peptides occurs via exosomes and that transfer of injury could happen from the neuron of peptide formation to neighboring neurons but also to neurons connected in neuronal networks.


Add to Calendar ▼2019-03-28 00:00:002019-03-28 00:00:00Europe/LondonExtracellular Vesicle-based Dx and Rx SummitExtracellular Vesicle-based Dx and Rx Summit in Coronado Island, CaliforniaCoronado Island, CaliforniaSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com