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SELECTBIO Conferences Stem Cells in Drug Discovery & Toxicity Screening 2018

James Hickman's Biography



James Hickman, Professor, Nanoscience Technology, Chemistry, Biomolecular Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Central Florida; Chief Scientist, Hesperos

James J. Hickman is a founder and current Chief Scientist of Hesperos, located in Orlando, Florida, which is focusing on cell-based systems for drug discovery and toxicity. He is also the Founding Director of the NanoScience Technology Center and a Professor of Nanoscience Technology, Chemistry, Biomolecular Science, Material Science and Electrical Engineering at the University of Central Florida. Previously, he held the position of the Hunter Endowed Chair in the Bioengineering Department at Clemson University. Dr. Hickman has a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Chemistry. For the past twenty-five years, he has been studying the interaction of biological species with modified surfaces, first in industry and in the latter years in academia. While in industry he established one of the first bioelectronics labs in the country that focused on cell-based sensors and their integration with electronic devices and MEMS devices. He is interested in creating hybrid systems for biosensor and biological computation applications and the creation of functional in vitro systems for human body-on-a-chip applications. He has worked at NSF and DARPA in the area of biological computation. He is a Fellow of both the American Institute of Medical and Biomedical Engineers (AIMBE) (2004) and the American Vacuum Society (AVS) (2007). He was a Board Member for AIMBE from 2009-2013 and Co-Chaired 6 AIMBE/NIH Workshops on “Validation and Qualification of New In Vitro Tools and Models for The Pre-clinical Drug Discovery Process” held at the NIH Campus, Bethesda, MD (2012 – 2017). Dr. Hickman along with Dr. Michael Shuler, won the Lush Prize, in the Science Category, which Supports Animal Free Testing in 2015. He has 135 publications and 20 book chapters, in addition to 22 issued patents out of 44 total patent applications.

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Human-on-a-chip Systems For Use in Efficacy and Toxicological Investigations in Pre-clinical Drug Discovery Utilizing Stem Cell-derived Disease Models

Friday, 5 October 2018 at 11:30

Add to Calendar ▼2018-10-05 11:30:002018-10-05 12:30:00Europe/LondonHuman-on-a-chip Systems For Use in Efficacy and Toxicological Investigations in Pre-clinical Drug Discovery Utilizing Stem Cell-derived Disease ModelsStem Cells in Drug Discovery and Toxicity Screening 2018 in Coronado Island, CaliforniaCoronado Island, CaliforniaSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

The utilization of multi-organ human-on-a-chip or body-on-a-chip systems for toxicology and efficacy, which ultimately should lead to personalized medicine applications, is a topic that has received much attention recently for drug discovery and subsequent regulatory approval. The considerable attrition-rate of drug candidates at all stages of development to a significant extent arises from the poor predictive nature of preclinical models for efficacy and toxicity, especially the inability to translate efficacy between preclinical and clinical situations. Systems capable of directly measuring organ function, biomarker release, and most importantly the synergistic interactions between organs, especially the generation of liver metabolites would be ideal. Our human-on-a-chip systems utilize function based cell models that accurately capture and predict multi organ complexity in response to administered compound within correctly scaled and physiologically relevant platforms. Our group, in collaboration with Dr. Michael Shuler from Cornell University, has been constructing these systems with up to 6 organs and have demonstrated long-term (>28 days) evaluation of drugs and compounds, that have shown similar response to results seen from clinical data or reports in the literature. Application of these systems for stem cell derived disease models of ALS and Alzheimer’s will be presented.  Cardiac and skeletal muscle mechanistic toxicity and PDPK modeling will also be addressed. Additionally, this talk will give results of six workshops held at NIH to explore what is needed for validation and qualification of these new systems.


Add to Calendar ▼2018-10-04 00:00:002018-10-05 00:00:00Europe/LondonStem Cells in Drug Discovery and Toxicity Screening 2018Stem Cells in Drug Discovery and Toxicity Screening 2018 in Coronado Island, CaliforniaCoronado Island, CaliforniaSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com