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SELECTBIO Conferences Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Biosensors 2021

Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Biosensors 2021 Agenda


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Monday, 13 December 2021

00:00

Paul YagerKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed
Paul Yager, Professor, Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, United States of America

00:00

Brian CunninghamKeynote Presentation

Digital Resolution Liquid Biopsy at the Point of Care
Brian Cunningham, Professor and Intel Alumni Endowed Chair, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States of America

As clinicians seek improved methods for tailoring medical treatment to the specific needs of individual patients, research is revealing that an important reservoir of information relevant to gene expression, mutation burden, immune response, and pathogen exposure is available in the profile of biomolecules present in bodily fluids.  Because samples can be obtained non-invasively, so-called “liquid biopsies” enable testing for disease onset, measuring the effects of therapy, and monitoring for disease recurrence after treatment. As liquid biopsy approaches become more routine, they also offer the promise for monitoring metrics for health/wellness, quantifying the effects of nutritional regimens, and determining the effects of exposure to a variety of environments.  Practical realization of this goal is challenging due to the extremely low concentration of relevant biomolecules within complex fluids, and the desire to accurately quantify concentrations that can vary over several orders of magnitude.  For widespread adoption, it is important to develop simple assay methods with inexpensive instruments that can potentially be used at the point of care. This talk will describe ultrasensitive and highly selective biomolecular detection approaches developed by our team that achieve digital resolution detection of nucleic acid and protein biomarkers with rapid, single-step, room temperature workflows that do not require enzymatic amplification.  Utilizing photonic metamaterials in combination with novel biochemistry methods for biomarker recognition, we envision liquid biopsy approaches that can provide quantitative assessments for multiplexed targets in point of care settings.

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Andres Martinez, Associate Professor, California Polytechnic State University, United States of America

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Jonathan D Posner, Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, United States of America

00:00

Joany JackmanKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Joany Jackman, Senior Scientist, Technical Lead, Technology Development Core, Johns Hopkins Center for Point-of-Care Technologies Research for Sexually Transmitted Diseases, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, United States of America

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Jonathan D Posner, Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, United States of America

00:00

Counting Molecules, Dodging Blood Cells: Continuous, Real-Time Molecular Measurements Directly in the Living Body
Kevin Plaxco, Professor, University of California-Santa Barbara, United States of America

The availability of technologies capable of tracking the levels of drugs, metabolites, and biomarkers in real time in the living body would revolutionize our understanding of health and our ability to detect and treat disease. Imagine, for example, a dosing regimen that, rather than relying on your watch (“take two pills twice a day”), is instead guided by second-to-second measurements of plasma drug levels wirelessly communicated to your smartphone. Such a technology would likewise provide researchers and clinicians an unprecedented window into neurology and physiology, and could even support ultra-high-precision personalized medicine in which drug dosing is optimized minute-by-minute using closed-loop feedback control. Towards this goal, we have developed a biomimetic, electrochemical sensing platform that supports the high frequency, real-time measurement of specific molecules (irrespective of their chemical reactivity) in situ in the blood and tissues of awake, freely moving subjects.

00:00

Steve SoperKeynote Presentation

Affinity Selection of Extracellular Vesicles using Plastic-based Microfluidic Devices for the Management of Different Diseases
Steve Soper, Foundation Distinguished Professor, Director, Center of BioModular Multi-scale System for Precision Medicine, The University of Kansas, Adjunct Professor, Ulsan National Institute of Science & Technology, United States of America

We have been developing tools for the diagnosis of a variety of diseases. The commonality in these tools is that they consist of microfluidic devices made from plastics via injection molding. Thus, our tools can be mass produced at low-cost to facilitate bench-to-bed side transition and point-of-care testing (PoCT). We have also been generating novel assays focused on using liquid biopsy samples that are enabled using microfluidics. In this presentation, I will talk about the evolution of our fabrication efforts of plastic-based microfluidic and nanofluidic devices as well their surface modification to make the devices biocompatible for in vitro diagnostics. One tool that we have generated is a plastic device (38 × 42 mm) that consists of 1.5M pillars, which are surface decorated with affinity agents targeting certain disease-associated extracellular vesicles (EVs). The affinity agents are covalently attached to the surface of the microfluidic device using a bifunctional linker, which consists of a coumarin moiety to allow for the photolytic release of the captured EVs using a blue-light LED to minimize photodamage to the EVs’ molecular cargo. We have also developed a high-throughput nano-Coulter counter (nCC) made from a plastic via injection molding for the counting of captured EVs from clinical samples to allow their enumeration. The nCC consists of multiple pores that are ~350 nm to allow for high throughput counting with exquisite LODs (500 EVs/mL). In this presentation, I will discuss the utility of these microfluidic and nanofluidic devices in several diseases, for example, using EVs as a source of mRNAs for molecular sub-typing of breast cancer patients. EVs were affinity selected from breast-cancer patients’ plasma by searching for both epithelial and mesenchymal expressing EVs to allow for highly efficient sub-typing using the PAM50 gene panel. In an addition, the microfluidic and nanofluidic devices were integrated into a single platform (modular-based system) for PoCT to screen for early stage ovarian cancer. Affinity probes were used to target EVs specifically generated from tumor cells that signal early-stage ovarian cancer disease with the nCC used for enumerating the number of EVs captured. Finally, the modular system was used for the detection of COVID-19 at the PoC by affinity selecting SARS-CoV-2 viral particles. The integrated system could process saliva samples to search for the viral particles and count them in <20 min.

00:00

Holger SchmidtKeynote Presentation

Advanced Optofluidic Devices for Point-of-Care Molecular Diagnostics
Holger Schmidt, Narinder Kapany Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of California-Santa Cruz, United States of America

Ultra-sensitive and compact instruments with low complexity are highly desirable for real-time point-of-care disease detection. I will describe liquid-core waveguide optofluidic devices for both fluorescence and label-free detection of SARS-CoV-2 from clinical nasal swab samples with single molecule sensitivity. Multiplex detection of single viral antigens is demonstrated along with dual detection of viral DNA and antigen as well as label-free nanopore sensing of single RNAs with 2,000x enhanced detection rate. I will also discuss strategies for implementing optimized particle recognition algorithms and real-time analysis of weak fluorescence signals from single molecules.

00:00

Danilo TagleKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Danilo Tagle, Associate Director For Special Initiatives, Office of the Director, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the NIH (NCATS), United States of America

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Mark Bradley, Professor, Schools of Chemistry and Medicine, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Tuesday, 14 December 2021

00:00

Joseph WangKeynote Presentation

Wearable Electrochemical Sensors for Healthcare, Nutrition, and Wellness
Joseph Wang, Distinguished Professor, SAIC Endowed Chair, University of California-San Diego, United States of America

Wearable sensors have received major recent attention owing to their considerable promise for monitoring the wearer’s health and wellness. These devices have the potential to continuously and non-invasively collect vital health information from a person’s body and provide this information in a timely fashion. This presentation will discuss our recent efforts toward filling the gaps toward obtaining biochemical information, beyond that given by common wrist-watch mobility trackers. Such real-time molecular information is achieved using advanced wearable electrochemical biosensors integrated directly on the epidermis or within the mouth. The fabrication and applications of such wearable electrochemical sensors will be described, along with their current status and future prospects and challenges.


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Add to Calendar ▼2021-12-13 00:00:002021-12-15 00:00:00Europe/LondonPoint-of-Care Diagnostics and Biosensors 2021Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Biosensors 2021 in Coronado Island, CaliforniaCoronado Island, CaliforniaSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com