Thursday, 4 October 2018

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Reyk HorlandKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Reyk Horland, Vice President of Business Development, TissUse GmbH, Germany

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Danilo TagleKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed
Danilo Tagle, Associate Director For Special Initiatives, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the NIH (NCATS), United States of America

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George TruskeyKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed
George Truskey, R. Eugene and Susie E. Goodson Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, United States of America

00:00

Nancy AllbrittonKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed
Nancy Allbritton, Kenan Distinguished Professor, Chair of UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, United States of America

00:00

Title to be Confirmed
Megan L McCain, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, University of Southern California, United States of America

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Roger KammKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed
Roger Kamm, Cecil and Ida Green Distinguished Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), United States of America

00:00

Shoji TakeuchiKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed
Shoji Takeuchi, Professor and Director, Collaborative Research Center for Bio/Nano Hybrid Process, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Leanna Levine, President, ALine, Inc., United States of America

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Microfluidic ChipShop GmbHChallenges and Solutions for Industrial Manufacturing of Organ-on-a-Chip Devices
Holger Becker, Chief Scientific Officer, Microfluidic ChipShop GmbH

While organ-on-a-chip is an academically thriving field in recent years, the successful commercialization of such devices will depend on the ability for industrial manufacturing. The presentation will highlight a variety of organ-on-a-chip devices which have been developed with methods paving the way towards commercial use and the associated challenges for volume manufacturing.

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Hiroshi Kimura, Associate Professor, Tokai University, Japan

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Ali KhademhosseiniKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Ali Khademhosseini, Professor, Department of Bioengineering, Department of Radiology, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California-Los Angeles, United States of America

00:00

Abraham LeeKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Abraham Lee, William J. Link Professor and Chair, University of California-Irvine, United States of America

00:00

Veryst Engineering, LLCModeling and Simulation of Microfluidic Organ-on-a-Chip Devices
Matthew Hancock, Managing Engineer, Veryst Engineering, LLC

Modeling and simulation are key components of the engineering development process, providing a rational, systematic method to engineer and optimize products and dramatically accelerate the development cycle over a pure intuition-driven, empirical testing approach. Modeling and simulation help to identify key parameters related to product performance (“what to try”) as well as insignificant parameters or conditions related to poor outcomes (“what not to try”). For microfluidic organ-on-chip devices, modeling and simulation can inform the design and integration of common components such as mixers, micropumps, manifolds, and channel networks. Modeling and simulation may also be used to estimate a range of processes occurring within the fluid bulk and near cells, including shear stresses, transport of nutrients and waste, chemical reactions, heat transfer, and surface tension & wetting effects. I will discuss how an array of modeling tools such as scaling arguments, analytical formulas, and finite element simulations may be leveraged to address these microfluidic organ-on-a-chip device development issues. I will also work through a few examples in detail.

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Linda GriffithKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Linda Griffith, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), United States of America

00:00

Dan Dongeun HuhKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed
Dan Dongeun Huh, Wilf Family Term Endowed Chair and Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineeering, University of Pennsylvania, United States of America

00:00

Title to be Confirmed
Luiz Bertassoni, Assistant Professor, Oregon Health and Science University/The University of Sydney, Australia

00:00

Leaf-Inspired Microvascular Patterns
Kara McCloskey, Associate Professor, University of California-Merced, United States of America

The vascularization of tissue grafts is critical for maintaining viability of the cells within a transplanted graft.  A number of strategies are currently being investigated including very promising microfluidics systems. We explored the potential for generating a vasculature-patterned endothelial cells (EC) that could be integrated into distinct layers between sheets of primary cells.  Bioinspired from the leaf veins, we generated a reverse mold with a fractal vascular-branching pattern that models the unique spatial arrangement over multiple length scales that precisely mimic branching vasculature. By coating the reverse mold with 50µg/ml of fibronectin and stamping enabled selective adhesion of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECS) to the patterned adhesive matrix, we show that a vascular-branching pattern can be transferred by microcontact printing.  Moreover, this pattern can be maintained transferred to a 3D hydrogel matrix and remains stable for up to 4 days. After 4 days, HUVECs can be observed migrating and sprouting into Matrigel. These printed vascular branching patterns, especially after transfer to 3D hydrogels, provide a viable alternative strategy to the prevascularization of complex tissues.

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Increasing Complexity of a Brain-on-a-Chip Device and Associated Neuronal Cultures
David Soscia, Biotechnology Engineer, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, United States of America

An in vitro brain-on-a-chip platform utilizing multi-electrode arrays (MEA) holds promise as a noninvasive experimental approach for evaluating toxicity of chemicals, validating new pharmaceutical drugs, and understanding neurological disease in humans.  Often, these devices contain a monolayer of a single purified primary neuronal cell type.  While these primary cultures can provide key insights into neuronal response and function, they fail to recapitulate in vivo cellular and molecular complexity as they lack representation and organization from multiple brain regions, as well as supporting glia.  Here, we present developments toward a more intricate in vitro system through advanced engineering and increased biological complexity.  A novel, removable cell seeding insert was developed to deposit neurons from different brain regions into separate regions of a substrate without the use of permanent physical barriers or chemical surface modifications.  Using the insert, we deposited primary rat cortical and hippocampal neurons into distinct regions of a custom 60-channel MEA.  Electrophysiology measurements were compared between the two systems over several weeks in vitro.  For the regionalized cell cultures, electrophysiology measurements demonstrated that while key firing characteristics were preserved for each neuronal type, some burst features were altered when the cells were co-cultured and able to form direct connections.  Separately, we evaluated the cellular activity of primary rat neuronal cultures cultured on the MEA containing additional supporting glial cell types (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocytes). For cultures containing glial cells, significant differences in electrophysiology responses were observed as cell culture complexity increased, including an earlier firing response and increased burst rate. Immunocytochemistry was used to identify each cell type, evaluate cell morphology, and assess the phenotypic state of supporting oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. These results suggest that a more complex brain-on-a-chip platform may provide additional insight and relevance to the in vitro brain model and will be validated using chemical challenges. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 through LDRD award 17-SI-002.

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Geraldine A HamiltonKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Geraldine A Hamilton, President/Chief Scientific Officer, Emulate Inc, United States of America

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Noo Li JeonKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Noo Li Jeon, Professor, Seoul National University, Korea South

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John WikswoKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed
John Wikswo, A.B. Learned Professor of Living State Physics; Founding Director, Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems, Vanderbilt University, United States of America

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Michael ShulerKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Michael Shuler, Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering, Cornell University; President & CEO, Hesperos, Inc., United States of America