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SELECTBIO Conferences 3D-Bioprinting and Tissue Engineering

Gabor Forgacs's Biography

Gabor Forgacs, Professor, University of Missouri-Columbia; Scientific Founder, Organovo; CSO, Modern Meadow

Dr. Gabor Forgacs is a theoretical physicist turned bioengineer turned innovator and entrepreneur. He is the George H. Vineyard Professor of Biological Physics at the University of Missouri-Columbia, the Executive and Scientific Director of the Shipley Center for Innovation at Clarkson University and scientific founder of Organovo, Inc. and Modern Meadow, Inc. He was trained as a theoretical physicist at the Roland Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary and the Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Moscow, USSR. He also has a degree in biology. His research interests span from topics in theoretical physics to physical mechanisms in early embryonic development. He is the co-author of the celebrated text in the field, “Biological Physics of the Developing Embryo” (Cambridge University Press, 2005) that discusses the fundamental morphogenetic mechanisms evident in early development. These mechanisms are being applied to building living structures of prescribed shape and functionality using bioprinting, a novel tissue engineering technology he pioneered. He is the author of over 160 peer-reviewed scientific articles and 5 books. He has been recognized by numerous awards and citations. In particular, he was named as one of the “100 most innovative people in business in 2010” by FastCompany.

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Bioprinting: The Present and the Outlook for the Field

Monday, 26 March 2018 at 09:00

Add to Calendar ▼2018-03-26 09:00:002018-03-26 10:00:00Europe/LondonBioprinting: The Present and the Outlook for the

Bioprinting is a young, highly interdisciplinary field. Its modern era commenced in 2000 with the work of Thomas Boland and his re-engineered Hewlett Packard desktop inkjet printer. Since then a number of other technologies have been developed utilizing extrusion, acoustic waves, laser assisted delivery and lately “liquid bioprinting”. The field has also matured from its purely academic roots into successful commercial ventures. Meanwhile the initial hype surrounding the field has substantially subsided even if not fully disappeared.  Long are the days when bioprinting has been hailed as a panacea for the chronic donor organ shortage, a method capable to replace dysfunctional tissue structures. At present it is mostly applied to the fabrication of sophisticated scaffold structures for tissue engineering and relatively small anatomically and physiologically relevant tissue constructs for drug development and testing and disease modeling.  Overall, bioprinting has seen spectacular progress in the past 17 years and a number of market analyses have predicted a bright future for the field. I will provide a hype-free overview of the technology, where it stands today, what it has specifically accomplished and what can be expected in the years to come.

Add to Calendar ▼2018-03-26 00:00:002018-03-27 00:00:00Europe/London3D-Bioprinting and Tissue