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SELECTBIO Conferences Organ-on-a-Chip, Tissue-on-a-Chip Europe 2018

Roger Kamm's Biography



Roger Kamm, Cecil and Ida Green Distinguished Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Roger Kamm is the Cecil and Ida Green Distinguished Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering and Director of the NSF Science and Technology Center for Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems. A primary objective of Kamm’s research group has been the application of fundamental concepts in fluid and solid mechanics to better understand essential biological and physiological phenomena. Spanning a wide range, research in the Kamm lab has addressed issues in the respiratory, ocular and cardiovascular systems. More recently, his attention has focused on two areas, the molecular mechanisms of cellular force sensation, and the development of new microfluidic technologies for vascularized engineered tissues and cancer. Kamm is the 2010 recipient of the Lissner Award from the ASME and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. He is the former chair of the US National Committee on Biomechanics and of the World Council on Biomechanics.

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Microphysiological Models Relying on Emergence of Multi-Cellular Engineered Living Systems

Tuesday, 5 June 2018 at 11:15

Add to Calendar ▼2018-06-05 11:15:002018-06-05 12:15:00Europe/LondonMicrophysiological Models Relying on Emergence of Multi-Cellular Engineered Living SystemsOrgan-on-a-Chip, Tissue-on-a-Chip Europe 2018 in Rotterdam, The NetherlandsRotterdam, The NetherlandsSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

Recent work from many labs has demonstrated the unique capability of cells placed in 3D culture to self-organize into functional units and organ-like systems.  In some cases, pluripotent cells can be induced to differentiate down independent pathways, leading to an organoid.  In others, interacting units can be generated, often from iPS cells, and ‘engineered’ to interact in a way that recapitulates certain aspects of in vivo function or disease.  Such models have tremendous potential both to gain new insight into disease processes and for moderate throughput drug screening.  In this talk I will describe several models developed in our lab including a neuromuscular junction, blood-brain barrier, and vascularized skeletal muscle, addressing some of the design principles they have in common, the future potential, and barriers to progress.


Add to Calendar ▼2018-06-05 00:00:002018-06-06 00:00:00Europe/LondonOrgan-on-a-Chip, Tissue-on-a-Chip Europe 2018Organ-on-a-Chip, Tissue-on-a-Chip Europe 2018 in Rotterdam, The NetherlandsRotterdam, The NetherlandsSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com