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SELECTBIO Conferences Lab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics Europe 2018

Ian Papautsky's Biography



Ian Papautsky, Richard and Loan Hill Professor of Bioengineering, Co-Director, NSF Center for Advanced Design & Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics, University of Illinois at Chicago

Dr. Papautsky is Richard and Loan Hill Professor of Bioengineering, Co-Director, NSF Center for Advanced Design & Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received the B.S. degree in biomedical engineering from Boston University in 1995 and the Ph.D. degree in bioengineering from the University of Utah in 1999. His current research focuses on use of microfluidics in cell separations and point-of-care sensor systems. He is a member of the DARPA Microfluidic Fundamental Focus (MF3) Center, and a founding member of The Ohio Center for Microfluidic Innovation (OCMI). He received BioOhio 30 in their 30 Award in 2007.

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Whole Blood Microfluidics: Fractionation and Isolation of Cells

Wednesday, 6 June 2018 at 09:30

Add to Calendar ▼2018-06-06 09:30:002018-06-06 10:30:00Europe/LondonWhole Blood Microfluidics: Fractionation and Isolation of CellsLab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics Europe 2018 in Rotterdam, The NetherlandsRotterdam, The NetherlandsSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

Inertial microfluidics is receiving considerable attention for applications in liquid biopsy.  However, while these devices have been widely explored for cell separation, sample dilution is necessary. Here, we report on a novel approaches to achieve cell separation directly from unprocessed whole blood based solely on cell size.  The separation is achieved through coupling of inertial effects with shear-induced diffusion. Our results from high-speed imaging reveal that focusing of larger cells near the channel centerline is possible, leading to easy separation. Whole blood spiked with fluorescently labeled beads and cells was used to demonstrate the separation principle and its performance without any sample pretreatment. Results confirm the high quality of performance in terms of efficiency (>90%) and RBC rejection rate (> 96%).  Ultimately, we successfully demonstrate the use of an inertial microfluidic device as a laboratory tool for sorting target cells from undiluted whole blood.


Add to Calendar ▼2018-06-05 00:00:002018-06-06 00:00:00Europe/LondonLab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics Europe 2018Lab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics Europe 2018 in Rotterdam, The NetherlandsRotterdam, The NetherlandsSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com