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SELECTBIO Conferences Microfluidics & Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2019

Danilo Tagle's Biography



Danilo Tagle, Director, Office of Special Initiatives, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the NIH (NCATS)

Danilo Tagle is currently Director, Office of Special Initiatives at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) where he coordinates efforts towards developing microphysiological systems or organs on chips. He also coordinates efforts on 3D bioprinting for drug discovery and development, on automated chemistry, on the use of electronic nose technology for disease diagnosis, and the clinical utility of secreted RNA in exosomes for biomarker and therapy development. Prior to joining NCATS in 2012, Dan was a program director for neurogenetics at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS, NIH), where he was involved in developing programs concerning genomics-based approaches for basic and translational research in inherited brain disorders. Prior to joining NINDS in 2001, Dan was an investigator and section head of molecular neurogenetics at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI, NIH) and has been involved in the highly collaborative effort toward the positional cloning of genes for Huntington’s disease, ataxia-telangiectasia and Niemann-Pick disease type C. He has served on numerous committees, advisory boards, and editorial boards. Dan obtained his Ph.D. in molecular biology and genetics from Wayne State University School of Medicine in 1990. He was an NIH National Research Service Award postdoctoral fellow in human genetics at the University of Michigan. Dan has authored many scientific publications and has garnered numerous awards, including more recently the Roscoe O. Brady Award for Innovation and Accomplishment, and the Henry J. Heimlich Award for Innovative Medicine.

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The NIH Microphysiological Systems Program: In Vitro Tools for Drug Development and Precision Medicine

Thursday, 14 November 2019 at 18:00

Add to Calendar ▼2019-11-14 18:00:002019-11-14 19:00:00Europe/LondonThe NIH Microphysiological Systems Program: In Vitro Tools for Drug Development and Precision MedicineMicrofluidics and Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2019 in Tokyo, JapanTokyo, JapanSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

Approximately 30% of drugs have failed in human clinical trials due to adverse reactions despite promising pre-clinical studies, and another 60% fail due to lack of efficacy. One of the major causes in the high attrition rate is the poor predictive value of current preclinical models used in drug development despite promising pre-clinical studies in 2-D cell culture and animal models. The NIH Microphysiological Systems (Tissue Chips) program led by NCATS is developing alternative approaches and tools for more reliable readouts of toxicity and efficacy during drug development. Tissue chips are bioengineered microphysiological systems utilizing human primary or stem cells seeded on biomaterials manufactured with chip technology and microfluidics that mimic tissue cytoarchitecture and functional units of human organs.  These platforms can be a useful tool for predictive toxicology and efficacy assessments of candidate therapeutics. Effective partnerships with stakeholders, such as regulatory agencies, pharmaceutical companies, patient groups, and other government agencies is key to widespread adoption of this emerging technology. Tissue chips can also contribute to studies in precision medicine, environment exposures, reproduction and development, infectious diseases, microbiome and countermeasures agents.


Add to Calendar ▼2019-11-14 00:00:002019-11-15 00:00:00Europe/LondonMicrofluidics and Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2019Microfluidics and Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2019 in Tokyo, JapanTokyo, JapanSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com