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SELECTBIO Conferences Microfluidics & Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2019

Martyn Boutelle's Biography



Martyn Boutelle, Professor of Biomedical Sensors Engineering, Vice Chair Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London

Martyn Boutelle is Professor of Biomedical Sensors Engineering, and Deputy Departmental Chair at the Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London. His research group is genuinely multidisciplinary comprising, bioengineers, scientists and clinicians. He develops novel analytical science methods using microfluidics, electrochemical sensors and biosensors, and wireless electronics to make portable, wearable monitoring devices. He then uses these in a program of clinical science research focusing on the acute traumatic brain injury, kidney transplantation and athelete monitoring. The same measurement techniques are used in patients and in experimental models allowing genuine translational research. Professor Boutelle is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. He obtained a BSc and PhD in Chemistry from Imperial College and worked as an EP Abraham Research Fellow in the University of Oxford.

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Approaches to Wearable Microfluidic Sensor Devices for Well-Being and Personalized Healthcare

Friday, 15 November 2019 at 12:15

Add to Calendar ▼2019-11-15 12:15:002019-11-15 13:15:00Europe/LondonApproaches to Wearable Microfluidic Sensor Devices for Well-Being and Personalized HealthcareMicrofluidics and Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2019 in Tokyo, JapanTokyo, JapanSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

A new generation of portable, wearable biomedical devices is becoming possible through recent advances in microfluidic technologies, microelectronics, sensors and biosensors. Key to this integration is the phenomenal growth in mobile computing power provided by current tablets and mobile phones.  Through miniaturization and carefully engineered smart designs we can embed computer control and analytical best practice into portable even wearable devices that are able to compensate for shortcomings such as falling performance. These hybrid microfluidic systems appear to their target users as simple stable systems that tell them what they want to know. My group specializes in designing and building such microfluidic systems to meet the needs of acute critical care medicine. Key molecular markers are measured using both optical and electrochemical sensors and biosensors. We then work with clinical care teams to show proof of concept of the real-time continuous chemical information that microfluidic systems can produce. Our ultimate goal is that such systems can be used to monitor patients and guide therapy in a patient-specific, personalized way.


Add to Calendar ▼2019-11-14 00:00:002019-11-15 00:00:00Europe/LondonMicrofluidics and Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2019Microfluidics and Organ-on-a-Chip Asia 2019 in Tokyo, JapanTokyo, JapanSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com