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SELECTBIO Conferences 3D-Printing and Biofabrication 2020

3D-Printing and Biofabrication 2020 Agenda


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Monday, 23 March 2020

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Fabien Guillemot, Chief Executive Officer, Poietis, France

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Aleksandr Ovsianikov, Associate Professor, Head of Research Group 3D Printing and Biofabrication, Technische Universität Wien (TU Wien), Austria

00:00

Adam FeinbergKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Adam Feinberg, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, United States of America

00:00

John FisherKeynote Presentation

3D Printing for the Engineering of Complex Tissues
John Fisher, Fischell Family Distinguished Professor & Department Chair; Director, NIH Center for Engineering Complex Tissues, University of Maryland, United States of America

00:00

Shulamit LevenbergKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Shulamit Levenberg, Professor and Dean, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

00:00

Gabor ForgacsKeynote Presentation

Tissue Engineering Beyond Regenerative Medicine: Biofabricating Leather
Gabor Forgacs, Professor, University of Missouri-Columbia; Scientific Founder, Organovo; CSO, Modern Meadow, United States of America

Most tissue engineering efforts are focused on applications in regenerative medicine to improve the quality of life of patients. Despite spectacular progress in the last 20 years the expected breakthrough to replace dysfunctional tissues in the organism or mitigate the chronic shortage of donor organs has not yet been achieved. This is not surprising given the enormous challenge facing the biofabrication of complex living structures in vitro and the associated astronomical expenditures. Here we propose a more modest, but more realistic utilization of the knowledge accumulated in tissue engineering and associated biofabrication technologies over the years. As an example we detail specific efforts to engineer a particular compartment of a complex tissue, the skin that gives rise to a commercially useful leather-like material. We compare our process with that followed by the leather industry to point out the advantages and disadvantages of both. We conclude by speculating more broadly on the significant potential social benefits of our approach.

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Jungwoo Lee, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, United States of America

00:00

Tal DvirKeynote Presentation

Engineering Personalized Tissue Implants: From 3D Printing to Bionic Organs
Tal Dvir, Professor, Director, Laboratory for Tissue Engineering and Regenerating Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel

In this talk I will describe cutting-edge technologies for engineering functional tissues and organs, including the heart, brain, spinal cord and retina. I will focus on the design of new biomaterials, mimicking the natural microenvironment, or releasing biofactors to promote stem cell recruitment and tissue protection. In addition, I will discuss the development of patient-specific materials and 3D-printing of personalized vascularized tissues and organs. Finally, I will show a new direction in tissue engineering, where, micro and nanoelectronics are integrated within engineered tissues to form cyborg tissues.

00:00

Orit ShefiKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Orit Shefi, Head of Neuroengineering Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering and Institute of Nanotechnologies and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University Israel, Israel

00:00

Y. Shrike ZhangConference Chair

Title to be Confirmed.
Y. Shrike Zhang, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Associate Bioenginering, Harvard Medical School, Associate Bioengineer, Division of Engineering in Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, United States of America

00:00

Xuanhe ZhaoKeynote Presentation

Merging Human-Machine Intelligence with Soft Materials Technology
Xuanhe Zhao, Associate Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), United States of America

While human tissues and organs are mostly soft, wet and bioactive; machines are commonly hard, dry and biologically inert. Merging humans and machines and their intelligence is of imminent importance in addressing grand societal challenges in health, sustainability, security, education and joy of living. However, interfacing humans and machines is extremely challenging due to their fundamentally contradictory properties. At MIT Zhao Lab, we exploit soft materials technology to form long-term, high-efficacy, compatible and seamless interfaces and convergence between humans and machines.  In this talk, I will first discuss the mechanics to design extreme properties including tough, resilient, adhesive, strong, fatigue-resistant and conductive for hydrogels, which are new yet ideal materials for human-machine interfaces. Then I will discuss a set of soft materials technology platforms including i). bioadhesives for instant strong adhesion of diverse wet dynamic tissues and machines; ii). hydrogel bioelectronics and biophotonics for long-term multimodal interfaces; iii). ferromagnetic soft robots for teleoperated or autonomous navigations and operations in previously inaccessible lesions. I will conclude the talk with a perspective on future human-machine convergence enabled by soft materials technology.

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
John Hundley Slater, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware, United States of America

00:00

3D Bioprinted Vascularized Glioblastoma Model
Guohao Dai, Associate Professor, Department of Bioengineering, Northeastern University, United States of America

Glioblastoma (GBM), the most malignant brain cancer, remains deadly despite wide-margin surgical resection and concurrent chemo- & radiation therapies. Two pathological hallmarks of GBM are diffusive invasion along brain vasculature, and presence of therapy-resistant tumor initiating stem cells. Deconstructing the underlying mechanisms of GBM-vascular interaction may add a new therapeutic direction to curtail GBM progression. However, the lack of proper 3D models that recapitulate GBM hallmarks restricts investigating cell-cell/cell-molecular interactions in tumor microenvironments. In this study, we created GBM-vascular niche models through 3D bioprinting containing patient-derived glioma stem cells (GSCs), human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMVECs) cells, pericytes, astrocytes and various hydrogels to model glioma/endothelial cell-cell interactions in 3D. In summary we have created GBM-vascular niche models that can recapitulate various GBM characteristics such as cancer stemness, tumor type-specific invasion patterns, and drug responses with therapeutic resistance. Our models have a great potential in investigating patient-specific tumor behaviors under chemo-/radio-therapy conditions and consequentially helping to tailor personalized treatment strategy. The model platform is capable of modifying multiples variables including ECMs, cell types, vascular structures, and dynamic culture condition. Thus, it can be adapted to other biological systems and serve as a valuable tool for generating customized tumor microenvironments.

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Yan Yan Shery Huang, University Lecturer in Bioengineering, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

00:00

Engineering Cryogel Scaffolds to Reconstruct Aspects of the Tumor Microenvironment
Sidi Bencherif, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, United States of America

Hypoxia, defined as low oxygen tension, is a characteristic feature of solid tumors and a hallmark of aggressive cancers. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia leads to tumor cell growth and invasion, resistance to apoptosis, and multi-drug resistance. For decades, a number of solid tumor models have been engineered to emulate key aspects of tumor biology such as hypoxia. However, challenges with tumor formation and reproducibility, inadequate biomechanical cues and 3D microenvironmental features provided to cells, and uncontrolled oxygen depletion among other limitations led to non-physiological tumor cell responses and inaccurate clinical predictions to anti-cancer drugs. To model solid tumors more accurately, we have recently developed an innovative approach using macroporous cryogel scaffolds to induce rapid oxygen depletion while enabling cellular rearrangement into spherical-like cell aggregates within a 3D polymer network. Our preliminary data suggest that our engineered cryogel scaffolds are capable of inducing local hypoxia while promoting tumor cell remodeling and aggressiveness, leading to anti-cancer drug resistance. Tumor-laden cryogels may mimic key aspects of the native tumor microenvironment, making these advanced cellularized scaffolds a promising platform for drug screening and potentially advancing drug development and discovery.

00:00

Joyce WongKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Joyce Wong, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering, Boston University, United States of America

00:00

David L. KaplanKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
David L. Kaplan, Stern Family Endowed Professor of Engineering, Professor & Chair -- Dept of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, United States of America

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Carol Livermore, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, United States of America

00:00

The Biologicalisation of Medicine and Manufacturing
William G Whitford, Strategic Solutions Leader Bioprocess, GE Healthcare Life Sciences, United States of America

The biologicalization (or the biological transformation) of manufacturing is essentially the use of digital manufacturing approaches (Industry 4.0) with biological and bio-inspired principles to support more efficient and sustainable manufacturing.  It creates a biomimetic  design – from reactions, equipment, and assemblies to materials, processes, and facilities.  For example, Nobel Prize winner Frances H. Arnold invented systems directing the evolution of enzymes now routinely used in development catalysts in manufacturing.  This approach to biologicalisation of processes is dependent upon advances in biochemistry, many of the ‘omics, as well as genetic engineering.  From another direction, advances in fermentation and cell-culture technologies is supplying a cell-based biologicalisation of processes.  Harmonization of digital principals with bio-integrated systems supports processes composed not only of biological chemistries, but of engineered organoids, tissues and cells. As supported by nano/micro-technology, cell-based systems can enable the goals of sustainability, economy and efficiency in research and therapeutics.


Agenda is not currently available
Add to Calendar ▼2020-03-23 00:00:002020-03-24 00:00:00Europe/London3D-Printing and Biofabrication 20203D-Printing and Biofabrication 2020 in Boston, USABoston, USASELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com