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SELECTBIO Conferences Innovations in Microfluidics 2020

Innovations in Microfluidics 2020 Agenda


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Monday, 23 March 2020

00:00

Roger KammKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Roger Kamm, Cecil and Ida Green Distinguished Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), United States of America

00:00

Joshua EdelKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Joshua Edel, Professor, Imperial College London, United Kingdom

00:00

Amy  ShenKeynote Presentation

Nanoplasmonic Platforms For Biosensing Applications
Amy Shen, Professor, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Japan

Fabricating large-scale bioplasmonic materials at high-throughput is important for the development of bio/chemical sensors and high resolution nanomaterial based bioimaging tools. However, techniques specific to large-scale synthesis of biocompatible nanoplasmonic materials have found limited acceptance in industry due to their time-consuming and complex fabrication procedures. Here, by exploiting properties of reactive ions in a SF6 plasma environment, we assemble nanoplasmonic substrates containing mushroom-like structures with SiO2 (insulator) stems and metal caps of gold (45-60 nm in total height, ~20 nm in width), evenly distributed with ~10 nm spacing on a glass substrate. We demonstrate that our developed gold nanomushroom (Au NM) substrate is biocompatible and sensitive for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based biosensing applications. This nanoplasmonic platform (coupled with microfluidics) is used for monitoring mitosis of fibroblasts for 7 days, E. coli biofilm formation, protein/DNA based immunoassays , and DNA polymerase activity in real-time.

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Shannon Stott, Assistant Professor, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School, United States of America

00:00

Title to be Confirmed.
Daniel Irimia, Associate Professor, Surgery Department, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Shriners Burns Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, United States of America

00:00

May the Capillary Force Be With You: Microfluidic Capillaric Circuits
David Juncker, Professor and Chair, McGill University, Canada

Microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip carry the promise of rapid analysis, economy of reagents and use at the point-of-care analysis using minute amounts of reagents. Here, our efforts in making microchannel-based capillary microfluidics will be discussed, and the realization of advanced circuits – termed capillaric circuits in analogy to electronic circuits –that realize complex fluidic operation simply by a combination of the microscale geometry and control over surface chemistry. Basic elements including capillary pumps, trigger valves, retention flow valves, air valves and so on, will be introduced, and their use for sequential autonomous and pre-programmed delivery of 96 reagents as well as for timing illustrated. The application of capillaric circuits for a rapid diagnostic for urinary tract infection in 7 min, measles vaccination testing, and automation of the thrombogram to characterize haemostatic-thrombotic mechanism of the blood will be presented. The transition from microfabrication to rapid prototyping and 3D printing of capillaric circuits makes them easy-to-fabricate and readily accessible to a wide audience.

00:00

Microfluidic Tools For Analyzing Cells Via Intrinsic Properties
Joel Voldman, Professor and Associate Department Head, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States of America

Microsystems have the potential to impact biology and medicine by providing new ways to manipulate, separate, and otherwise interrogate cells.  Simply physically manipulating cells—using microfluidics, electric fields, acoustics, etc.—provides new ways to separate cells and organize cell-cell interactions.  One example illustrating the power of microscale manipulation of cells is to sort cells based on their intrinsic electrical properties.  Electrical properties have previously been correlated with important biological phenotypes (apoptosis, cancer, etc.), but a sensitive and specific method approach has been lacking.  We have developed a method called iso-dielectric separation that uses electric fields to drive cells to the point in a conductivity gradient where they become electrically transparent, resulting in a continuous separation method specific to electrical properties.  With this method, we are developing a point-of-care assay that can quickly assay immune cell activation, which has applications for monitoring inflammation in sepsis and other immune disorders.

00:00

Peter ErtlKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Peter Ertl, Professor of Lab-on-a-Chip Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

00:00

Albert FolchKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Albert Folch, Professor of Bioengineering, University of Washington, United States of America

00:00

Mehmet TonerKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Mehmet Toner, Helen Andrus Benedict Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, United States of America

00:00

David WeitzKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
David Weitz, Professor, Harvard University, United States of America

00:00

An Integrated Microfluidic Platform for Multi-Dimensional Analysis and Multi-Omic Classifications of Effector Immune Cell Functions
Tali Konry, Associate Professor, Northeastern University, United States of America

The outcome of many pathological diseases such as infection and cancer is determined by the interaction of diseased cells with various immune cell subsets, both of which are phenotypically and functionally diverse. Induced resistance to chemo- and immuno-therapeutic drugs remain one of the main challenges in modern medicine. Moreover, there exists significant inter-patient and even intra-patient variability in response to well-established drug regimens, making it difficult to predict a patient’s response to applied treatments. Single-cell analysis techniques have great potential in revealing, and ultimately utilizing, patient-specific cellular information to devise a more personalized approach to therapeutic regimens. Towards this goal we have developed a platform technology for characterizing single cell response, cell-cell communication and novel drug/immunotherapy targets in various diseases and overall could be beneficial in improving the efficacy of antibody drug therapy and develop effective drug combinations.

00:00

Suvajyoti GuhaKeynote Presentation

Advancing Innovation in Microfluidics: The Regulatory Perspective
Suvajyoti Guha, Mechanical Engineer, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), United States of America

The objective of this talk would be to provide an update on the activities US FDA has engaged on for advancing innovation in microfluidics. The current collaborations, the type of research being done, and the steps FDA has taken to gather real world data on microfluidics will also be discussed.

00:00

Merging Human Microphysiological Systems with Quantitative Systems Pharmacology for In Vitro In Vivo Translation
Murat Cirit, CEO & Co-Founder, Javelin Biotech, United States of America

A large percentage of drug candidates fail at the clinical trial stage due to a lack of efficacy and unacceptable toxicity, primarily because of translational gap between human physiology and preclinical models including both in vitro culture and animal models. This need for more human-physiology relevant in vitro systems for preclinical efficacy and toxicity testing has led to a major effort to develop “Microphysiological Systems (MPS)”, aka tissue chips (TC) or organs on chips (OOC), based on engineered human tissue constructs.

MPSs hold promise for improving therapeutic drug approval rates by providing more physiological, human-based, in vitro assays for preclinical drug development activities compared to traditional in vitro and animal models. The full impact of MPS technologies to bridge the gap preclinical and clinical gap will be realized only when robust approaches for in vitro–in vivo (MPS-to-human) translation are developed and utilized.

00:00

Michael ShulerKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Michael Shuler, Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering, Cornell University, President & CEO, Hesperos, Inc., United States of America

00:00

Devices for Isolation and Cultivation of Bacteria
Edgar Goluch, Associate Professor, Northeastern University, United States of America

The vast majority of bacterial species in environment as well as inside of our bodies have never been isolated and studied in a laboratory. While ‘omic techniques are providing incredible insights about microbial cells and populations, functions and interactions remain largely unknown. In this talk, I will present several iterations of microfluidic devices that my group has developed for isolating and culturing bacteria. These devices are being used to create libraries of cultivars that can be screened for production of novel compounds and metabolic processes, as well as for providing a better fundamental understanding of the role that bacteria play in human health and the environment.

00:00

Joint-on-a-Chip as Alternative to Animal Models in Arthritis Research
Mario Rothbauer, Researcher, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

With a prevalence of about 1%, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory joint disease, characterized by progressive, intermittent inflammation leading to joint destruction and are among the most frequently diagnosed diseases in aged patients. The talk will cover the development of multiplexed organ-on-a-chips as next-gen in vitro models as disease model resembling onset and progression of inflammatory arthritis. Also, a teasing outlook on its application potential for replacement of animal models and future drug screening efforts will be discussed.


Agenda is not currently available
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