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SELECTBIO Conferences Organ-on-a-Chip World Congress 2019

Organ-on-a-Chip World Congress 2019 Agenda



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Monday, 14 October 2019

00:00

John WikswoKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
John Wikswo, Gordon A. Cain University Professor, A.B. Learned Professor of Living State Physics; Founding Director, Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems, Vanderbilt University, United States of America

00:00

Microengineering Human Lung Airway Mimicry: Now and Future
Kambez Benam, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering, University of Colorado Denver, United States of America

Development of new therapeutics for pulmonary disorders, and advancement in our understanding of inhalational toxico-pathology have been hindered by challenges to study organ-level complexities of human lung in vitro. Moreover, clinical relevance of widely used animal models of respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which poses a huge public health burden, is questionable. Here, we applied a tissue microengineering approach to create a ‘human lung small airway-on-a-chip’ that supports full differentiation of a pseudostratified mucociliary bronchiolar epithelium from normal or diseased donors underlined by a functional microvascular endothelium. Small airway chips lined with COPD epithelia recapitulated features of the disease including selective cytokine hypersecretion, increased neutrophil recruitment, and clinical exacerbations by exposure to pathogens. Using this robust in vitro approach, it was possible to detect synergistic tissue-tissue communication, identify new biomarkers of disease exacerbation, and measure responses to anti-inflammatory compounds that inhibit cytokine-induced recruitment of circulating neutrophils. Importantly, by connecting the small airway chip to a custom-designed electromechanical instrument that ‘breathes’ whole cigarette smoke in and out of the chip microchannels, we successfully recreated smoke-induced oxidative stress, identified new ciliary micropathologies, and discovered unique COPD-specific molecular signatures. Additionally, this platform revealed a subtle ciliary damage triggered by acute exposure to electronic cigarette. Thus, the human small airway-on-a-chip offers a powerful complement to animal models for studying human lung pathophysiology.

00:00

Nancy AllbrittonKeynote Presentation

Intestine on a Chip: Tools to Screen Metabolites, Drugs & Microbiome
Nancy Allbritton, Kenan Professor of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering and Chair of the Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, United States of America

Organs-on-chips are miniaturized devices that arrange living cells to simulate functional subunits of tissues and organs providing exquisite control of the tissue microenvironment for the investigation of organ-level physiology and disease. Human organ-on-chips are transforming biomedical research providing platforms that accurately replicate human tissues and the diversity of human responses. These technologies are expected to fundamentally alter drug discovery and development by providing human constructs for screening assays and toxicity measurements. We have developed an open, planar format of a 3D polarized epithelium using primary human gastrointestinal stem cells to fully recapitulate intestinal epithelial architecture and physiology. When placed onto a shaped hydrogel scaffold, crypt-like structures develop following application of chemical gradients across the scaffold creating a polarized epithelium with a stem-cell niche and differentiated cell zone. A dense mucus layer (400 microns thick) is readily created on the luminal epithelial surface and acts as a barrier to bacteria and their toxins. An oxygen gradient across the tissue mimic permits luminal culture of anaerobic bacteria while maintaining an oxygenated stem cell niche. Our in vitro human colon crypt array replicates the architecture, luminal accessibility, tissue polarity, cell migration, and cellular responses of in vivo intestinal crypts. This bioanalytical platform is envisioned as a next-generation system for assay of microbiome-behavior, drug-delivery and toxin-interactions with the intestinal epithelia.

00:00

InSphero AG, Schlieren, SwitzerlandImplementing a Scalable Body-on-a-Chip Metabolic Disease Model based on Human Liver and Islet Microtissues
Olivier Frey, Product Manager Microphysiological Systems, InSphero AG, Schlieren, Switzerland

Liver and pancreas constitute key organs in the metabolic syndrome and are highly interacting through different endocrine factors to maintain glucose homeostasis in the human body. An impaired function of one of the organs can cause metabolic diseases, such as diabetes or NASH. Studying these diseases requires a systemic model that can reproduce organ-organ-interactions. The practical implementation of human in-vitro multi-tissue systems in a scalable format includes several challenges. Key aspects encompass biological and technical reproducibility, availability of tissue models, possibility of on-demand production, their usability in suitable treatment windows, access to clinically relevant readouts, and system compatibility with standard lab processes. We implemented a human in-vitro multi-tissue system in a scalable format using 3D organotypic microtissues for establishing organ-organ interactions. The liver model consisted of a primary human hepatocyte/Kupffer cell co-culture with preserved metabolic and inflammatory function over at least two weeks. The primary human islet microtissues comprised all pancreatic endocrine cells at physiological ratio and remained glucose responsive over the same culturing period. The different microtissues were assembled in a microfluidic chip using a pipetting robot enabling an adequate number of replicates at minimal operational complexity for compound testing with access to a wide range of readouts.

00:00

Danilo TagleKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Danilo Tagle, Associate Director For Special Initiatives, Office of the Director, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the NIH (NCATS), United States of America

00:00

Shoji TakeuchiKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Shoji Takeuchi, Professor, Center For International Research on Integrative Biomedical Systems (CIBiS), Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan

00:00

Veryst Engineering, LLCModeling and Simulation of Microfluidic Organ-on-a-Chip Devices
Matthew Hancock, Managing Engineer, Veryst Engineering, LLC

Modeling and simulation are key components of the engineering development process, providing a rational, systematic method to engineer and optimize products and dramatically accelerate the development cycle over a pure intuition-driven, empirical testing approach. Modeling and simulation help to identify key parameters related to product performance (“what to try”) as well as insignificant parameters or conditions related to poor outcomes (“what not to try”). For microfluidic organ-on-chip devices, modeling and simulation can inform the design and integration of common components such as mixers, micropumps, manifolds, and channel networks. Modeling and simulation may also be used to estimate a range of processes occurring within the fluid bulk and near cells, including shear stresses, transport of nutrients and waste, chemical reactions, heat transfer, and surface tension & wetting effects. I will discuss how an array of modeling tools such as scaling arguments, analytical formulas, and finite element simulations may be leveraged to address these microfluidic organ-on-a-chip device development issues. I will also work through a few examples in detail.

00:00

Roger KammKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Roger Kamm, Cecil and Ida Green Distinguished Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), United States of America

00:00

George TruskeyKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
George Truskey, R. Eugene and Susie E. Goodson Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, United States of America

00:00

Michael ShulerKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Michael Shuler, Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering, Cornell University, President & CEO, Hesperos, Inc., United States of America

00:00

Steven C. GeorgeKeynote Presentation

Title to be Confirmed.
Steven C. George, Professor and Chair, University of California, Davis, United States of America

00:00

Microfluidic ChipShop GmbHIt’s the Economy – Industrial Aspects of Organ-on-a-Chip Device Manufacturing
Holger Becker, Chief Scientific Officer, Microfluidic ChipShop GmbH

While academic activities in the organ-on-a-chip field have multiplied in recent years, it becomes apparent that translating academic results into commercially viable products can be challenging. This is even more true for such devices which require a generically multidisciplinary approach, combining application know-how with surface chemistry, microfabrication and materials technology. In this presentation, we will give an overview over available solutions for such products and explain classical pitfalls on the way from the academic laboratory bench to an industrial product.


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Add to Calendar ▼2019-10-14 00:00:002019-10-15 00:00:00Europe/LondonOrgan-on-a-Chip World Congress 2019Organ-on-a-Chip World Congress 2019 in Coronado Island, CaliforniaCoronado Island, CaliforniaSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com